Kin Food
kinfood:

(via Italian lentil and chestnut stew — Mostly Eating)
hello kinfood! <3 i just wanted to give a hint to any of the wildcrafting kin that follow you! goldenrod is in season right now and is a really wonderful and plentiful ingredient! not many animals aside from insects partake of it. but it's good for getting warm fuzzy nature feelings. you can infuse it in honey, vinegar and also dry it to use for tea!

Thanks!

Also I’m going to be taking foraging classes soon. If anyone’s into wildcrafting/foraging/gathering let me know and maybe I can post about it here?

-Fox

(via Purslane, Meyer Lemon, and Pear Salad with Kaffir Lime Vinaigrette Recipe at Epicurious.com)
graveyarddirt:

Wild Mushroom Sauce, by Ms. Graveyard Dirt
Yesterday’s version of Antonio Carluccio’s Mushroom Sauce was made with locally picked wild mushrooms (chanterelles and boletes), duck fat, homegrown herbs from Gothel’s Garden, a generous handful of Wild Woodland Mix and a few cloves of my "Fuck Me!" garlic.
MUSHROOM SAUCE”This Italian sauce can be used in many ways and is utterly delicious. It is good for flavouring pasta, rice and polenta, but can also top crostini or flavour meat or fish dishes. It is best when made with fresh or dried ceps,  but you can also use giant polypore or chicken of the woods. The sauce can be frozen." - Antonio Carluccio, The Complete Mushroom Book
INGREDIENTS:* 300g small fresh ceps* 15g dried ceps soaked in warm water* 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped* 4 tbsp olive oil* 2 tbsp finely chopped parsley* 2 mint leaves, finely chopped* 1 tbsp tomato paste* salt and pepper to taste
METHOD:Clean the fresh ceps, then cut into small cubes. Drain the dried ceps after 20 minutes, reserving the water, then chop finely.
Fry the garlic in the oil until transparent, then add the fresh and soaked dried mushrooms. Fry for about 10 minutes over a medium heat. Season to taste. Add  the parsley, mint, tomato paste and 4 tablespoons of the reserved cep soaking water. Warm through, and the sauce is ready.
If you use this sauce for pasta - especially - sprinkle with a little grated Parmesan before serving.
* Additional foodie smut can be found in The Black Arts

graveyarddirt:

Wild Mushroom Sauce, by Ms. Graveyard Dirt

Yesterday’s version of Antonio Carluccio’s Mushroom Sauce was made with locally picked wild mushrooms (chanterelles and boletes), duck fat, homegrown herbs from Gothel’s Garden, a generous handful of Wild Woodland Mix and a few cloves of my "Fuck Me!" garlic.

MUSHROOM SAUCE
This Italian sauce can be used in many ways and is utterly delicious. It is good for flavouring pasta, rice and polenta, but can also top crostini or flavour meat or fish dishes. It is best when made with fresh or dried ceps, but you can also use giant polypore or chicken of the woods. The sauce can be frozen." - Antonio Carluccio, The Complete Mushroom Book

INGREDIENTS:
* 300g small fresh ceps
* 15g dried ceps soaked in warm water
* 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
* 4 tbsp olive oil
* 2 tbsp finely chopped parsley
* 2 mint leaves, finely chopped
* 1 tbsp tomato paste
* salt and pepper to taste

METHOD:
Clean the fresh ceps, then cut into small cubes. Drain the dried ceps after 20 minutes, reserving the water, then chop finely.

Fry the garlic in the oil until transparent, then add the fresh and soaked dried mushrooms. Fry for about 10 minutes over a medium heat. Season to taste. Add the parsley, mint, tomato paste and 4 tablespoons of the reserved cep soaking water. Warm through, and the sauce is ready.

If you use this sauce for pasta - especially - sprinkle with a little grated Parmesan before serving.

* Additional foodie smut can be found in The Black Arts

Salads are usually served at the beginning of a meal, but they can also make healthy, low-calorie meals. Keep them interesting by changing the ingredients each time. Start with a bed of low-calorie greens and add lots of vegetables, fruits, and other healthy toppings:

Most salads begin as a pile of leafy green vegetables. Since greens are low in calories and are a good source of fiber, it’s a great way to add volume to your meal without adding a lot of calories. There are different varieties of lettuce, such as iceberg, leaf, spinach, escarole, romaine, or butter. The darker lettuces offer more vitamins than pale iceberg, for example. Spinach has iron, and all varieties are low in calories. One cup of shredded lettuce has about five to ten calories.

Almost any raw vegetable can be cut up and added to a salad. Green beans, snap peas, carrots, radishes, broccoli, cauliflower, zucchini, asparagus, artichokes, avocadosslimcados, tomatoes, and cucumbers are all great suggestions. You need five to nine servings of fruits and vegetables per day, so eating a salad is a good way to meet those needs. Brightly colored vegetables have flavonoids, and the dark green vegetables are lowest in calories — about 20 calories per half cup serving.

Blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, apple slices and raisins can add vitamins and antioxidants to your salad. The delicious burst of flavor and sweetness they add may also reduce the amount of high-calorie salad dressing you use. One-half cup of apple slices has 30 calories, and one-half cup of berries has about 40 calories.

Add a small amount of protein with a chopped or sliced hard-boiled egg, or one serving of lean beef, cooked shrimp, tuna, chicken breast, or strips of cheese. Make sure to measure your proteins, since meats and cheese have more calories than fruit or vegetables. Avoid fried meats like chicken strips or battered and fried shrimp. They contain too much fat and lots of calories. A quarter cup of chopped chicken meat or one egg will add 75 calories. Half a can of tuna will add about 80 calories. Two ounces of cubed or shredded mozzarella or cheddar cheese may add up to 200 calories.

Sprinkle a few nuts like walnuts, pecans, almonds, or cashews for a nice crunch. Just a few nuts will do, about one-eighth cup of nuts adds about 90 calories. Walnuts are a great source of omega-3 fatty acids, and all the nuts add protein and heart-healthy polyunsaturated fatty acids.

One tablespoon of regular commercial salad dressing will add 50 to 80 calories, so be careful to measure how much you use. A large salad may look like it needs a lot dressing, but remember that one-quarter cup of dressing could add up to 300 calories. Low-fat and reduced calorie dressings are available or you can add some freshly squeezed lemon or lime juice to your salad.

Here’s an example of a big healthy dinner salad:

  • Two cups of green leaf lettuce.
  • One-fourth cup raw green beans.
  • One-fourth cup snap peas.
  • One-fourth cup chopped tomato.
  • One-fourth cup sliced carrots.
  • One-fourth cup apple slices.
  • One-fourth cup blueberries.
  • One-fourth cup chopped chicken breast.
  • One chopped hard boiled egg.
  • One ounce of shredded mozzarella cheese.
  • One-eighth cup walnut pieces.
  • lemon and lime wedges.

This salad has lots of vitamins, antioxidants, phytochemicals and fiber and comes in at just under 400 calories. Serve this salad with a glass of iced tea or a big glass of sparkling water with lemon.

Hello! I am a fictivekin, a Kokiri from the Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time game. I know that you have a tag for the series, but it's primarily got things from the later games. OoT doesn't really go into our diet, but we don't leave the forest so all our food comes from there. Could you help with finding some recipes involving stuff you can forage? Thank you in advance :)
Anonymous

I think the Wildcrafting tag is just what you’re looking for.

-Wolf

In regards to my diet.

billygoatkingruff:

I am a vegetarian, but I don’t do that whole tofu thing. If a goat can survive on fresh greens, why can’t I?

Luckily, I have a wooded area right behind my apartment. It’s full of blackberries, wild onions, dandelions, turnips, and tons of my favorite flowers. I browse there daily, and get most of my nutrition from there. Usually I gather things and then bring them home and wash them before eating. Sometimes I eat things as I find them.  I bring my lighter sometimes to cook things a little as I eat them. It makes them sweeter. 

I also eat the grass. I don’t usually eat it directly from the ground. I prefer to pull it out the ground and then munch on it. I eat the regular grass on my lawn mostly. Grass doesn’t taste bad. Some people think it’s dirty and gross, but as I previously stated, animals eat grass, why shouldn’t we? I prefer the taste of grass when it’s beginning to die. It gets crunchier and starts to taste sweeter. 

There’s a stretch of gorgeous Bermuda grass a few miles away from me. Most of our grass is St.Augustine, but then there’s this random field of this amazing grass. It feels so fluffy compared to the grass we have.  Sometimes I drive there when I’ve had a stressful day, and just lay there. It’s fenced in, so I have to park across the street and climb over the fence, which is a snap and sometimes gives me phantom shifts in my hooves.The grass tastes much different than the grass from my yard. It’s a tiny bit sweeter and it tastes less like grass and more like lettuce. It’s delicious. Whenever I go I get some extra in a bag and bring it home with me. 

Besides the things I find around me, I eat lots of lettuce, spinach, celery, and peanut butter (for protein). 

I think all humans should try grasses and flowers. There are so many different flavors. We have enough food right on the land we walk on. 

Since this was tagged ‘kinfood’ I hope you don’t mind me responding/putting my two cents in on this blog.

First off, you should not eat grass! The problem with it is not that it’s ‘dirty and gross’. Most grass is poisonous in and of itself to human bodies (and one must always keep in mind when consuming food that you have to work with the, let’s say operating system, you’ve got). Since you mention specific grasses like St. Augustine and such, I can safely assume you’re referring to a manicured lawn, which could be sprayed with herbicides or pesticides, which are ridiculously toxic/poisonous. Here’s a concise answer on Yahoo regarding further reasons why you shouldn’t consume grass.

Secondly, and to reiterate my initial point, just because a goat can survive off of it doesn’t mean you can. Such a diet is incompatible with your operating system. I adore wildcrafting/foraging, and you’re quite lucky to live in such a good area for it, but I urge you to go about it in a more safe and practical way than just meandering into a wooded area and eating anything you see. You could cause yourself to become violently ill or even die. 

I always feel like this is such a ‘common sense’ thing that I don’t really address it, but it is SO important to remember at all times, no matter how bad your species dysphoria, you cannot consume things that are unsafe for human consumption and expect your body to react differently than it would for anyone else. That’s why this blog exists, so we can find a happy medium. Food that satisfies kin-related cravings but is safe and palatable for a human body. 

Other than just that major point about not eating grass or just any old plant without checking to make sure it’s safe, I loved this post and its sentiment. 

Hi there! Just wanted to let you know that many sources on the Internet say that pine needle tea can induce abortion. Just thought you should add a warning.

Someone already commented on this and I posted the warning. I’ll post this one as well.

-Fox

(via http://greek.food.com/recipe/garlic-potatoes-with-juniper-berries-423665)